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Quail Coop

By Carole West of GardenUp green

We live in a time where people are looking to do more themselves. It’s exciting and yet sometimes disturbing for those living in the suburbs. Becoming self reliant doesn’t have to be disruptive and you don’t need to move to the countryside, simply start where you are.

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Have you ever thought about raising quail in your backyard? Did you know quail offer similar benefits as chickens? You can raise quail for the purpose of eggs and meat.

Quail are a quieter option to backyard homesteading and this is something your neighbors may appreciate? Raising Quail is another backyard option for those looking to add a little self reliance to their lifestyle.

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I’ve been raising quail for awhile and through my experience I’ve discovered these birds are best raised in a natural environment providing interaction with the ground.

The backyard quail coop is a simplistic housing option for those with limited space. This coop is easy to move and can house up to 15 coturnix quail. Place near your garden and you have a natural way to deplete the bug population.

This coop offers some key elements that allow for easy access and protection. The frame was constructed with 2 x 4’s, presenting a sturdy structure so when it comes time to move on clean grass the structure can handle the transport.

A little house is attached at the end for quail to enter; mainly for shade or comfort from bad weather. When temperatures are extreme you can easily place a temporary tarp over the frame for additional insulation. You can access this little house by opening the roof, add in some hay and the quail will find this a cozy getaway.

The run has another large door on top for easy access where food and fresh water can be added, both openings close with a latch so the wind cannot lift them open. Getting birds in and out is not a problem as you simply open a door, reach down and grab.

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You might be wondering what type of quail is best to own. First make sure there are no restrictions where you live prior to getting started. Second you need to also know that quail are not poultry, quail are wild game birds and do not follow the same guidelines as chickens.

I currently raise Bobwhite and Coturnix quail, I enjoy both for different reasons and they live in separate coops on our farm. Through my experience I’ve discovered coturnix quail to be the best option for a backyard setting.

Coturnix also known as Japanese quail are more domestic, smaller, better egg layers, and they mature faster than other quail breeds. Egg production begins between 6 and 8 weeks and harvest for meat between 10 and 12 weeks.

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The backyard quail coop is a 5 x 3 structure that’s easy to move in your backyard. Raising quail naturally on the ground allows quail to live in an environment where their instincts shine. They love to nest in the grass and search for bugs.

If you’re looking to add a little self reliance to your backyard think quail and come visit me this weekend at the THG Dallas Show. Attend the 2pm Backyard Quail Coop workshop on Sunday where I’ll be demonstrating how this coop works. Great news! This Coop is scheduled to Giveaway afterwards. There will be live quail for viewing and my book, Quail Getting Started Second Edition.

Hope you see you there!

garden-up-greenCarole West is the founder and writer of GardenUp Green. She’s been gardening since she was a small child, learning from her Italian grandmother. Carole shares her all natural gardening techniques and projects on GardenUp Green so that readers can learn, discover, and be inspired. Carole has been putting together patio gardens and backyard escapes and has even ventured into small scale farming. Her greatest reward comes from her family. Their love and understanding has helped her build an amazing and creative life! Check out GardenUp Green on Facebook, Hometalk, and Pinterest.

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